Wednesday, May 17, 2017

Congrats to the new "Certified Speaking Professionals" (CSP)

The National Speakers Association Certifies 43 Speaking Professionals

The National Speakers Association® (NSA), the leading organization for the professional speaking industry, is proud to announce 43 professional speakers have earned the CSP™ (Certified Speaking Professional) designation in 2017.

It has been three years since I earned my CSP, and I have always been proud to be part of this unique group of speakers.  Just over 800 professional speakers have this designation.

Established in 1980, the CSP is the speaking profession’s international measure of speaking experience and skill. 

The CSP designation is conferred by NSA on accomplished professional speakers who have earned it by meeting strict criteria. CSPs must document a proven track record of continuing speaking experience and expertise, as well as a commitment to ongoing education, outstanding client service, and ethical behavior. The 2017 class of CSPs will be honored during a ceremony on July 8 at Influence 2017, NSA’s annual convention in Lake Buena Vista, Fla.

"The CSP™ (Certified Speaking Professional) designation is the highest earned specification that can be achieved by a member of the National Speakers Association or Global Speakers Federation Member Associations,” says 2016-2017 NSA President John B. Molidor, Ph.D., CSP. “Achieving the CSP designation is no easy task; professional speakers must show documented proficiency over a minimum of five years, must receive positive evaluations from their clients, and must be evaluated and affirmed through a peer review process. When meeting professionals hire a Certified Speaking Professional, they can be assured the speaker brings to the table a high-level of expertise and competency, superior speaking ability, and a proven track record of professionalism and success.”

Introducing the 2017 Class of Certified Speaking Professionals:

Christopher Bianez, CSP, Plano, Texas
Aram Boyd, CSP, Danville, Calif.
Guy Burns, CSP, Virginia Beach, Va.
Mary M. Byers, CSP, Chatham, Ill.
Max Stanley Chartrand, PhD, CSP, Casa Grande, Ariz.
David J. Chinsky, CSP, Bloomfield Hills, Mich.
Heather Christie, JD, CSP, Naples, Fla.
Dennis Cummins, DC, CSP, Miller Place, N.Y.
Sima Dahl, CSP, Chicago, Ill.
Dirk W. Eilert, CSP, Berlin, Germany
Lee Ellis, CSP, Atlanta, Ga.
Celynn Morin Erasmus, CSP, Johannesburg, South Africa
Steve Foran, CSP, Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
Sandro Forte, FPSA, CSP, London, England
Chris Fuller, CSP, Arlington, Texas
Chuck Gallagher, CSP, Greenville, S.C.
Merit Gest, CSP, Denver, Colo.
Charmaine Hammond, CSP, North Vancouver, British Colombia, Canada
Stacey L. Hanke, CSP, Chicago, Ill.
John M. Hannon, CSP, Sarasota, Fla.
Joel Hilchey, CSP, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
Michelle E.W. Howison, CSP, Houston, Texas
Sydne Jacques, CSP, Salt Lake City, Utah
Bethanne Kronick, CSP, Camp Sherman, Ore.
Alesia Latson, CSP, Boston, Mass.
Rob Lilwall, CSP, Lantau Island, Hong Kong
Gary Lynn, PhD, CSP, Milburn, N.J.
Tim Marvel, CSP, Dallas, Texas
Marty Mercer, CSP, Atlanta, Ga.
Tod C. Novak, CSP, Newport Beach, Calif.
Gerry O’Brion, CSP, Denver, Colo.
Kathleen D. Pagana, PhD, CSP, Williamsport, Pa.
Matthew Pollard, CSP, Austin, Texas
Thomas Ray, CSP, Sarasota, Fla.
Philipp Riederle, CSP, Burgau, Germany
Dean Savoca, CSP, Denver, Colo.
Jeff Shore, CSP, Auburn, Calif.
Bill Stainton, CSP, Seattle, Wash.
Carolyn Strauss, CSP, Denver, Colo.
William “T” Thompson, JD, CSP, Colorado Springs, Colo.
Jerome Wade, CSP, Albuquerque, N.M.
Crystal Washington, CSP, Houston, Texas
Ken Weichert, CSP, Nashville, Tenn.

Congratulations to all.

Have A Great Day

thom singer

Monday, May 15, 2017

7 Tips to Reach Your Super Potential

The new keynote presentation that I have developed, The Paradox of Potential, is getting positive responses from audiences and cultivating more conversation than predicted.  After my speeches people are lining up to discuss how they view their inner potential and what is actually happening in their career.

The concept of this talk (and eventual book) is based on the feedback from hundreds of people I have surveyed who admit to not believing they are reaching their career potential (about 70% feel they are coming up short of their ability).  There is a noticeable gap between potential and results, and much of happens because of the small things that people are overlooking.  Rarely is it some giant problem looming in their past.

The same shortfalls are true of corporate teams and non-profit organizations.  While most who are engaged in these groups feel they have "Super Potential" in what they could be accomplishing, the lower than expected results are weighing heavy.  

Getting the results that you desire will not happen by accident. You and your team must be clear about what you are trying to accomplish and have a true understanding of your motivation.  Going through the motions without direction should not be the norm, yet too many feel they are unclear about what they are actually working toward. Additionally you need to surround yourself with people who will help promote you and your cause. Your network matters!

Here are seven tips to help you reach your super potential:

1. Set clear career goals
2. Try new things / Take risks
3. Believe in your capabilities
4. Show gratitude to those who help you
5. Ask for help / delegate
6. Work past the fear
7. Connect with people

This does not have to be rocket science.  Like most things in life, steering toward success is not nearly as complicated as we try to make it. Take the necessary steps daily in good times and bad.  Keep doing the right things and over time you will be among those that others look to as the example.  There are no shortcuts and there is no way to outsource your success.

Have A Great Day.

thom singer